Château Cos d’Estournel – Wine Tasting Event

12-3-2015 Château Cos d’Estournel tasting at Virginia Philip Wine Shop & Academy, West Palm Beach, Florida

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It is always special to attend a tasting of one of the world’s greatest wine producers, whether young or old. So of course we were excited to attend a Cos d’Estournel tasting that included three vintages of the grand vin, with a few other wines from the Cos stable. The tasting was directed by Etienne de Nantes, a representative from Cos d’Estournel, who gave a nice presentation of the château’s history and its wines. Having recently tasted the 2005 Cos d’Estournel, it was great to taste this great vintage once again. The surprise of the night was the 2004, which should turn into a very nice wine. Each tasting of a wine from 2004 confirms that this vintage may turn out quite well. And while many Bordeaux from the 2004 vintage are quite accessible now, it seems the 2004 Cos needs a bit more time. It is well-structured though, and could turn into a wine with impressive longevity. Essentially every wine tasted seemed to need more time in bottle, but they all could still be enjoyed now with a proper decant. One thing is for sure; Cos d’Estournel is producing some impressive wines, even in so-called ‘off-vintages.’ It was a good night indeed.


IMG_67332012 Goulée

Lots of dark fruits, blackberry, coffee, and oak spice. Full-bodied, with somewhat rough tannins. Excellent length to the finish, but some bitterness and high acidity. This is a bit austere and not ready for drinking yet. Give it some time to smooth out its rough edges.

2011 Les Pagodes des Cos

A fresh nose of plum, blackberry, chocolate, licorice, and earth. Lush and lighter in weight than the Goulée. The Merlot character really shows through. Very soft tannins, but a bit short on the finish. This is a wine with some approachability, but still needs years in the bottle.

2002 Château Cos d’Estournel

Dark, concentrated, and youthful. Red and dark fruits, pepper, and licorice. Lots of spiciness. Oak still hasn’t integrated at this stage. Firm tannins. Lacks a bit in the mid-palate. A smooth, elegant finish. A strong showing from 2002, and still young for the vintage. I was surprised by the ripeness and purity of fruit with this wine. Give it time.


 

IMG_67372004 Château Cos d’Estournel

Still quite young but showing nice balance. Good ripeness of the plum and red fruits. More dense than the 2002, but the nose is more subdued than the 2005. Lots of tannins still to be resolved. Overall, I really enjoyed the style with this wine and its balance. While you can drink this now, I would still wait a few years before opening.

2005 Château Cos d’Estournel

Quite an intense nose, with lots of spiciness. Also showing mocha, ultra-ripe fruit, and floral notes. This is a powerful wine that really leaves a mark on your palate. Still very tannic. Long finish. It’s easy to sense the serious potential with this wine, but this wine is nowhere near ready. Will certainly give much more pleasure in the future. Wait 5-10 years on this.

2012 Château Cos d’Estournel Blanc

Really floral and nutty. Stone fruits and citrus on the nose as well. Really smooth, with few hard edges. Very good freshness on the finish.

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Château Cos d’Estournel – 1990

1990 cos d'estournelLived up to its pedigree. ~30 minutes of air opened up the nose nicely. Also had a slight acidic edge initially that resolved. Really dark fruits, smoke, tobacco, spice, and licorice. Silky on the palate, with medium weight. A finish that lingered on and on. Acidity a bit forward. Still has tannins to resolve. Likely at or near its peak, but likely has considerable time left. No reason not to drink this now if you have it. – 95pts Nov 2015

St. Julien VS St. Estephe Tasting Comparison (1959 to 2000)

08-14-2015 St. Julien VS St. Estephe Tasting at Wine Watch, Ft. Lauderdale.

One of the great things about the wines of Bordeaux is their many diverse styles, even among close neighbors. Much of this diversity is not just due to differences in winemaking styles, but also the variations in terroir. It is pretty amazing to think that soil differences, slope elevation, or the relative proximity to the Gironde estuary can really create subtle differences among the wines. For this reason, we were intrigued to participate in a tasting that compared selected wines from two appellations of the Haut-Médoc, St. Julien and St. Estèphe. Within both appellations are some of the great wines of Bordeaux, many of which were showcased in the tasting, held at the Wine Watch Boutique in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. And just to make it more fun and interesting, we decided to turn the tasting into a battle of sorts, with each appellation pitted against the other.


IMG_97631959 Château Montrose vs. Ducru-Beaucaillou…St. Julien vs. St. Estephe round 1. Starting with the Ducru, some thought there might be some TCA taint, but I didn’t detect any at all. Instead there was some brett (but not powerful) and lots of dusty aromas. Funky, medicinal, dried herbs, dusty old library books, but dark fruits struggling to stay alive. Amber-brown with still good concentration. Completely resolved tannins. We both liked it, but if even a hint of brett turns you off, don’t attempt this ’59 Ducru. The ’59 Montrose was still powerful and not at all austere (as some like to pigeonhole St. Estèphe). Nice garnet color and fragrant aromatics, with cassis, soy, leather, soil, and spice. Drinking quite well for a ’59, with a smoothness and beautifully balancing acidity. Impressive concentration and length on the finish. There is still lots of life left here. So the winner goes to St. Estèphe in round 1.


IMG_53441966 Château Talbot vs. 1975 Château Montrose…St. Julien vs. St. Estèphe round 2. It was interesting trying the ’66 Talbot a week after trying the ’64. The ’66 beats it in complexity and current drinkability. Dark and red fruits, truffled toast, leather, and old library book. Has a bright acidity, but the flaw in this wine is that it was a bit tart on the finish. Still an enjoyable mature claret that is probably on its final descent. The ’75 Montrose, on the other hand, did not impress much and lagged big-time behind the ’59. Cassis, leather, and green pepper. Still fairly tannic with high acidity. An austere wine that is not particularly anything to write home about. Round 2 goes to St. Julien.


IMG_53451982 Château Cos d’Estournel vs. Château Gruaud Larose…St. Julien vs. St. Estèphe round 3. The biggest smack-down of the evening. The room was divided on which was the ‘better’ wine. Starting with the Cos, this is more evolved aromatically than the Gruaud. Dark and red fruits, roasted meat, leather, brown spices, clove, damp soil, and green pepper. The aromatic complexity was matched on the palate. Impressive length on the finish with very silky tannins. Something tells me this won’t improve, but it’s currently at the top of its game. The Gruaud Larose (our WOTN) was simply awesome. Dark, concentrated and appearing young at times. Cassis, leathery, licorice, and spice. Mouth-filling, with silky but fairly prominent tannins. Impeccable balance. A stunner. St. Julien wins by a nose in round 3.


IMG_53461985 Château Gruaud Larose vs. 1989 Château Léoville Barton…both St. Julien, but round 4. ’85 Gruaud Larose had a great nose, one of the best of the flight (as long as a little brett doesn’t bother you). Cassis, hint of brett, olive, black tea, tobacco, anise, and green pepper. Not quite as impressive on the palate but a nice mature claret. In its drinking window. The ’89 Léoville Barton, while not as powerful as many other vintages of Barton, had a nose probably the equal of the Gruaud Larose (but younger with fewer tertiary elements). Dark fruits, blackberry, strong licorice, truffle, and mocha. Smooth drinking, and probably not yet at its peak. How much can it improve? We’ll see. The Léoville Barton probably wins by a nose.


IMG_53472000 Château Léoville Barton vs. Château Calon Ségur…St. Julien vs. St Estèphe round 5. Can two wines be any different? First of all, the Calon Segur was a 375ml, so it’s hard to really compare these two from an evolution standpoint. The 2000 Léoville Barton was similar to other recently tasted bottled…very young, lots of power and concentration, tannic, serious structure. The Calon Ségur was also very dark, with impressive concentration. Dark/red fruits, tobacco, sweet background oak (think butterscotch), and cocoa. Lush and well-balanced. Hard to call a winner here…but probably Barton due to its potential.


In the end, both appellations fared well and were pretty evenly matched. But this was all in good fun, and wine isn’t really about competitions; it’s about enjoyment and savoring every last sip. We would be happy to have any of these wines in our cellar…especially that 1982 Gruaud Larose.