Margaux – Pauillac Tasting – Wines from 1959 to 2000

11-4-2015 Margaux – Pauillac tasting at Wine Watch, Ft. Lauderdale

Margaux_Pauillac_wine_tastingContinuing the theme of appellation tastings, Wine Watch in Fort Lauderdale hosted yet another great tasting. This time, the tasting highlighted the Pauillac and Margaux appellations. What made this tasting more special was that it truly showcased some of the best châteaux from these esteemed appellations. The Margaux appellation was represented by only Margaux and Palmer, while Pauillac wines included Grand-Puy-Lacoste, Lynch-Bages, and Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande. There was also a wide range in vintages tasted, from 1959 to 2000. The appellations were evenly matched, and there was no clear winner on this night


1959_Palmer_GPL1959 Château Palmer (Margaux). The WOTN. A dark garnet hue with brown edges; the color was the oldest aspect of the wine. Nose was still very much alive. Cherry liqueur, raisin, tobacco, and a hint of barnyard. Complex and layered, this was one wine that seemed to gain momentum throughout the evening. While more concentrated than the GPL, it was still on the lighter side. Structure hanging on. A special wine. 97/100.

1959 Château Grand Puy Lacoste (Pauillac). Improved throughout the night, but more of an average aged Bordeaux. Similar aromatics, with cherry, fig, raisin, and tobacco. Lacked some weight on the mid-palate and fell a bit flat on the finish. Still an enjoyable wine if you find it. Clearly this round goes to the Palmer. 91/100.


1961_LynchBages_Palmer1961 Château Lynch-Bages (Pauillac). Drinking extremely well for a ’61. Still with excellent concentration and deep color. Cassis, black cherry, leather, Asian spices, and cedar. Opened up over two hours and improved significantly in the glass. Still has a solid tannic structure. Only knock would be a bit high acid on the (lengthy) finish. 94/100.

1966 Château Palmer (Margaux). Not a favorite in the room, but I personally considered this the #2 of the night. Dark fruit, smoke, earth, and some beautiful barnyard scent. Exceptional balance. Everything seems in its right place. Extremely smooth on the palate. Long finish. The Palmer edges out the Lynch-Bages in this round. 95/100.


1983_Margaux_LynchBages1983 Château Margaux (Margaux). Has that perfume one would expect. Dark and red fruits, spice, and floral notes. Solid mid-palate. Still with prominent tannins. Long finish. Again, a wine with exceptional balance. Its strengths are its complexity and concentration, but not really a stunner. 95/100.

1983 Château Lynch-Bages (Pauillac). The most unique wine of the night. Cassis, licorice, old dusty library book, and urban funk (distinct from a barnyard funk). This strange nose was initially off-putting, but became quite charming. More elegance than power. Still has a bit of grip. No detectable heat on the medium length finish. Acidity a bit out of balance. Definitely better than the 81 point wine scored by RP. This round goes to the Margaux, but for the value, this Lynch-Bages is something to look at if you don’t mind funkiness. 91/100.


1995_Margaux_Lalande1995 Château Margaux (Margaux). Perhaps the disappointment of the night, considering its pedigree. Shy on the nose, but had a nice mix of dark fruits, spice, and floral. Full-bodied and mouth-filling on the palate. Structured as can be. Very long finish. So why a disappointment? It’s very far from showing its true colors, so it was hard to be too excited about it tonight. 93/100.

1995 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande (Pauillac). More powerful than the Margaux, with a more open nose. Black currant, cedar, and mint. Lacks the earthiness of typical Pichon Lalandes. Sampled the ’96 Pichon Lalande last night, and the ’96 is definitely the superior vintage with far more complexity. Better on the nose than palate right now. A little tart on the finish. Still, tonight the Lalande beats the Margaux (though that will change in 10 years). 94/100.


LynchBages_Palmer2000 Château Palmer (Margaux). Similar to last bottle enjoyed a few months ago. This is a great Palmer, but like the ’95 Margaux, so far from its potential. Blackberry, raspberry, lots of violets, and mocha. Concentrated and tannic. My first note I wrote was, ‘tons of potential.’ Cellar this baby, and drink your ’83 and ’89 Palmers. 93/100.

2000 Château Lynch-Bages (Pauillac). Simply a great wine. Lots of layers, with cherry, tobacco, pencil shavings, and cigar box. Nice balance of power and elegance. Has serious grip. A fantastic finish. No bitterness and acidity is where it should be. This round goes to the Lynch-Bages. 95/100.

LynchBages_bottles

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Pomerol VS Saint-Émilion Tasting

Pomerol and Saint-Émilion Tasting at Wine Watch in Ft. Lauderdale 10-21-2015

IMG_6200This year, Wine Watch in Fort Lauderdale has hosted tastings that compare two appellations. Obviously we decided that we just can’t miss any of these, especially one that includes an older Pétrus. Pomerol holds a special place in our hearts for multiple reasons. First of all, the wines of Pomerol are some of the most charming and unique in Bordeaux. But perhaps more importantly, older Pomerols can sometimes be so elusive to obtain. And let’s not ignore St.-Émilion, which had some heavy hitters in the tasting as well. The 1975 Pétrus was certainly one of the stars of the evening, but the 1998 Trotanoy has the potential to perhaps eclipse it. On the St.-Émilion side, the more modern style Valandraud and Peby Faugères stole the show, beating out classics Cheval Blanc and Canon. But on a night like this, one just has to feel fortunate to taste any of these greats. But if there’s one takeaway from this night, it’s that the Right Bank did very well in 1998.


IMG_62531975 Pétrus from Pomerol. Still with a deep, dark color. Nose of dried plum, dark fruit, licorice, mineral, cedar, and mushroom. Pure elegance in a glass. Still has a solid structure, with silky tannins. Gorgoeous finish. 97 pts


IMG_62541988 Château Lafleur from Pomerol. Exotic. Brighter red fruit than the Pétrus, a little pepper, truffle, and Asian spices. Solid mouthfeel. Still fairly tight and tannic. An impressive long finish. Took on a slight oxidized note after 4 hours, which was a bit concerning considering the present tannin structure. Not a crowd pleaser, but more of a bruiser at this stage. 93 pts

1989 Château La Fleur Pétrus from Pomerol. Initially disappointing, this did show some improvement with a couple of hours in the glass. Medium ruby color. A bit light, lacking concentration. Cherry and plums dominate. Would like to see more tertiary elements at this stage. Notable acidity. Slight bitterness to the finish, which subsided. 91 pts


IMG_62551989 Château Le Gay from Pomerol. One of the better surprises of the evening. Took lots of time to show itself and open up, but was quite impressive when it did. A much more evolved nose than the ’89 La Fleur Pétrus, with black currant, cherry, cedar, tobacco, espresso, and a hint of green pepper. Solid tannic structure. Like the balance here. Long finish. 95 pts

1998 Château Trotanoy from Pomerol. Really interesting to try this after drinking a bottle of this recently. Interesting bottle variation, with this bottle showing a hint of Brettanomyces (but in a very good way). Black currant, blackberry, earth, truffle, and espresso. Powerful but elegant at the same time. Full-bodied on the palate, hitting on all cylinders. Beautiful, long finish. A memorable wine. 97 pts


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1967 Château Cheval Blanc from St.-Émilion. The biggest disappointment of the evening. Like drinking chewing tobacco enveloped in a wall of tannins. Disjointed and flat. Aromatically very evolved, but the structure is still overbearing. Not much to like with this bottle. Hopefully, this was just a bad example. 87  pts

1985 Château Canon from St.-Émilion. Like the ’89 Le Gay, became much better after a couple of hours in the glass. Light ruby color. Fruity and earthy nose, with a charming old library book scent (which is so common in mature Canon). Light-medium body, almost Burgundian in a way. The strength here is the excellent finish, which just seemed to linger. Not a special wine, but I wouldn’t mind trying this again, with its very charming nose. 92 pts


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1998 Château Petit Cheval from St.-Émilion. Much more memorable than the ’67 Grand Vin. Red fruit, spice, and cedar. A fresh nose. Adequate mid-palate. Still quite tannic and tight. A good finish with no bitterness noted. 91 pts

1998 Château Valandraud from St.-Émilion. Another one of the strongest wines of the night. An amazing nose…still young and bursting with fruit, but with tobacco, sweet musk, and espresso. Definitely an exotic feel to this. Great mid-palate and finish. Silky on the palate. Love the concentration, balance, and overall like-ability. 95 pts


IMG_62581998 Château Peby Faugeres from St.-Émilion. Still appears very young. Very dark color, minimal lightening of the edges. Ripe plum, blackberry, licorice, spice, and chocolate. Full-bodied. Tannins still need a bit of further integration. Acid balances well with the fruit. Impressive length on the finish. 95 pts


IMG_6275At the end of the tasting, we opened up a couple of interesting bottles. We didn’t have high hopes for the 1967 Carruades de Lafite, but the 1995 was a treat and a surprise. The 1995 vintage has been known by many to be a somewhat tannic and backward vintage, but the Beychevelle showed very well and was quite approachable.

St. Julien VS St. Estephe Tasting Comparison (1959 to 2000)

08-14-2015 St. Julien VS St. Estephe Tasting at Wine Watch, Ft. Lauderdale.

One of the great things about the wines of Bordeaux is their many diverse styles, even among close neighbors. Much of this diversity is not just due to differences in winemaking styles, but also the variations in terroir. It is pretty amazing to think that soil differences, slope elevation, or the relative proximity to the Gironde estuary can really create subtle differences among the wines. For this reason, we were intrigued to participate in a tasting that compared selected wines from two appellations of the Haut-Médoc, St. Julien and St. Estèphe. Within both appellations are some of the great wines of Bordeaux, many of which were showcased in the tasting, held at the Wine Watch Boutique in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. And just to make it more fun and interesting, we decided to turn the tasting into a battle of sorts, with each appellation pitted against the other.


IMG_97631959 Château Montrose vs. Ducru-Beaucaillou…St. Julien vs. St. Estephe round 1. Starting with the Ducru, some thought there might be some TCA taint, but I didn’t detect any at all. Instead there was some brett (but not powerful) and lots of dusty aromas. Funky, medicinal, dried herbs, dusty old library books, but dark fruits struggling to stay alive. Amber-brown with still good concentration. Completely resolved tannins. We both liked it, but if even a hint of brett turns you off, don’t attempt this ’59 Ducru. The ’59 Montrose was still powerful and not at all austere (as some like to pigeonhole St. Estèphe). Nice garnet color and fragrant aromatics, with cassis, soy, leather, soil, and spice. Drinking quite well for a ’59, with a smoothness and beautifully balancing acidity. Impressive concentration and length on the finish. There is still lots of life left here. So the winner goes to St. Estèphe in round 1.


IMG_53441966 Château Talbot vs. 1975 Château Montrose…St. Julien vs. St. Estèphe round 2. It was interesting trying the ’66 Talbot a week after trying the ’64. The ’66 beats it in complexity and current drinkability. Dark and red fruits, truffled toast, leather, and old library book. Has a bright acidity, but the flaw in this wine is that it was a bit tart on the finish. Still an enjoyable mature claret that is probably on its final descent. The ’75 Montrose, on the other hand, did not impress much and lagged big-time behind the ’59. Cassis, leather, and green pepper. Still fairly tannic with high acidity. An austere wine that is not particularly anything to write home about. Round 2 goes to St. Julien.


IMG_53451982 Château Cos d’Estournel vs. Château Gruaud Larose…St. Julien vs. St. Estèphe round 3. The biggest smack-down of the evening. The room was divided on which was the ‘better’ wine. Starting with the Cos, this is more evolved aromatically than the Gruaud. Dark and red fruits, roasted meat, leather, brown spices, clove, damp soil, and green pepper. The aromatic complexity was matched on the palate. Impressive length on the finish with very silky tannins. Something tells me this won’t improve, but it’s currently at the top of its game. The Gruaud Larose (our WOTN) was simply awesome. Dark, concentrated and appearing young at times. Cassis, leathery, licorice, and spice. Mouth-filling, with silky but fairly prominent tannins. Impeccable balance. A stunner. St. Julien wins by a nose in round 3.


IMG_53461985 Château Gruaud Larose vs. 1989 Château Léoville Barton…both St. Julien, but round 4. ’85 Gruaud Larose had a great nose, one of the best of the flight (as long as a little brett doesn’t bother you). Cassis, hint of brett, olive, black tea, tobacco, anise, and green pepper. Not quite as impressive on the palate but a nice mature claret. In its drinking window. The ’89 Léoville Barton, while not as powerful as many other vintages of Barton, had a nose probably the equal of the Gruaud Larose (but younger with fewer tertiary elements). Dark fruits, blackberry, strong licorice, truffle, and mocha. Smooth drinking, and probably not yet at its peak. How much can it improve? We’ll see. The Léoville Barton probably wins by a nose.


IMG_53472000 Château Léoville Barton vs. Château Calon Ségur…St. Julien vs. St Estèphe round 5. Can two wines be any different? First of all, the Calon Segur was a 375ml, so it’s hard to really compare these two from an evolution standpoint. The 2000 Léoville Barton was similar to other recently tasted bottled…very young, lots of power and concentration, tannic, serious structure. The Calon Ségur was also very dark, with impressive concentration. Dark/red fruits, tobacco, sweet background oak (think butterscotch), and cocoa. Lush and well-balanced. Hard to call a winner here…but probably Barton due to its potential.


In the end, both appellations fared well and were pretty evenly matched. But this was all in good fun, and wine isn’t really about competitions; it’s about enjoyment and savoring every last sip. We would be happy to have any of these wines in our cellar…especially that 1982 Gruaud Larose.